Julie Rafalski

The Erroneous Disposition of the People

Posted in News by Julie Rafalski on September 3, 2013

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I am pleased to announce that I have a few written pieces in The Erroneous Disposition of the People, which came out earlier this year. The book contains prose and poetry inspired by Thomas Browne’s Pseudodoxia Epidemica, 1646. Other contributors include James Wilkes, Eddie Farrell, David Henningham and David Barnes. It was published (and beautifully bound) by Henningham Family Press.

More about the book and/or to buy the book (paperback edition £9.99), click here

Footnotes Exhibition Photos

Posted in Exhibitions by Julie Rafalski on August 7, 2013

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The work

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The cakes, generously made by Belinda Feldman

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The wallpaper (Some amazing wallpaper I found in the backstage area. Apparently it was designed by one of William Morris’ apprentices.)

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The Chapel

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The opening night

 

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The poster (available for  £20 without frame. Contact email@julierafalski.com if you’d like one)

Footnotes Exhibition

Posted in Exhibitions, News by Julie Rafalski on July 3, 2013

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My new show Footnotes opens later this month. As part of Islington Exhibits I will be showing some new prints that I made during the last month, at the Union Chapel.

The Opening (with drinks and sweets) is on 

Monday, 22nd July 6pm – 8pm

Union Chapel, Compton Ave, London N1 2XD (Highbury & Islington Tube)

The exhibition will remain up until the 31st of July but due to the Union Chapel holding other events, the exhibition will only be open at the following times, during which I will also be there, so feel free to pop in and say hello.

Also open 10am – 12 noon on the following days:
Mon 15th July
Tue 16th July
Thu 18th July
Tue 30th July
Wed 31st July

And 12 noon – 2pm
on Saturday 20th July alongside Daylight Music 

And during all events at the Union Chapel between 15th-31st July.

 

Union Chapel page link:

http://www.unionchapel.org.uk/pages/islington_exhibits_julie_rafalski.html

 

Islington Exhibits Events page link:

http://islingtonexhibits.com/exhibitors-gallery-2013

Residency at Fritz Hansen Day 2

Posted in Exhibitions, News by Julie Rafalski on June 11, 2013

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A new collage from last week’s residency at Fritz Hansen. The piece was made with an inkjet print of Mies van der Rohe’s Highfield House and coloured paper.

Residency at Fritz Hansen Day One

Posted in Exhibitions, News by Julie Rafalski on June 4, 2013

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Residency at the Republic of Fritz Hansen

Posted in Exhibitions, News by Julie Rafalski on May 28, 2013

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I’ll be an artist in residence at the Republic of Fritz Hansen design shop on June 3rd and 4thwhere I’ll be showing some brand new print and collage pieces as well. 

 
The opening night is Monday 3rd June 6-8pm
 
For the residency I’ll be working on two new pieces throughout those two days from 10.00am- 6.30pm.
Feel free to pop in at any time to chat and see what I’m working on. 
 

Republic of Fritz Hansen

(near Oxford Street tube) 13 Margaret Street, London W1W 8RN

www.fritzhansen.com

Artist of the Month at Kahaila

Posted in Exhibitions by Julie Rafalski on February 27, 2013

I’ll be showing a selection of recent work as well as brand new work at the Kahaila Cafe next month.

The opening night features music by

Wilderthorn ( https://www.facebook.com/wilderthorn )

and

Flight Brigade ( http://www.flightbrigade.com )

Thursday, March 7th at 7.30pm

Kahaila, 135 Brick Ln, London E1 6SB

Free Entry.

The work will remain on display until 3rd April.

Residency Post #6: Uncatalogued Books

Posted in Exhibitions by Julie Rafalski on February 21, 2013

This is a series of blogs posts about my residency at the Westminster Reference Library that coincides with my exhibition Not in View, which continues until 23rd February. Westminster Reference Library Gallery, 1st Floor; 35 Saint Martin’s Street, London WC2H 7HP

From the big wooden table I’m sitting at, I have a view of the countless colourful book spines on the library shelves. If you rummage in any one of these books, you may find many different types of marks in its pages: underlined texts, circled words, starred items, highlighted sentences, doodles or notes scribbled in the margin. Then there are rips and folds in the pages, worn edges, missing pages and pieces of paper stuck inside books.

These markings and peculiarities might add increased emphasis to a highlighted sentence or pull your attention away to another portion of the page, where there might be a profusion of doodles. The content of the books, even if only very marginally, is warped by these markings.  All these interventions make the readers seem more like users as opposed to just passive readers, while the interventions themselves become more like attempts at a form of communication with future readers.

Once a book has been modified, it is unique. There is not a single book that is identical with the same exact markings, even if it stems from the same print run. A modified book thus has an extra layer added to it and becomes a new type of document, one which records the series of interactions it has had with its users.

The library archive, full of these books, becomes a different type of archive altogether. An archive not only of knowledge categorized by subject matter, but also an archive of uncatalogued interactions in the form of doodles, scribbles, shaky lines, rips, folds, all of which have no authors, no titles and have not been entered into the library computer system.

 

Residency Post #5: Villa Savoye

Posted in Exhibitions by Julie Rafalski on February 20, 2013

This is a series of blogs posts about my residency at the Westminster Reference Library that coincides with my exhibition Not in View, which continues until 23rd February. Westminster Reference Library Gallery, 1st Floor; 35 Saint Martin’s Street, London WC2H 7HP

Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye (in Poissy, France) was completed in 1931 for Pierre and Emilie Savoye as a summer house. The client’s brief allowed for almost unfettered freedom in the design of the building. In many ways this is Le Corbusier’s ideal house. His free floor plan with no load-bearing walls allowed Le Corbusier to place interior walls  where he deemed aesthetically pleasing. He instructed the Savoyes to have as little furniture and as few belongings as possible, as he thought furniture was unnecessary and should be replaced by equipment.

Le Corbusier’s ideal house was purely functional and rid of any decoration. He defined the function of a house with three points: “1. A shelter against heat, cold, rain, thieves and the inquisitive. 2. A receptacle for sun and light. 3. A certain number of cells appropriated for cooking, work and personal life.”

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Accordingly, Villa Savoye’s aesthetic is minimal and industrial. The cylindrical structure on the roof, the tubular railings and the clinical white of its walls are reminiscent of an ocean liner.  A ramp leading from the entrance to the first floor is visible from almost every corner of the house, implying the movement of vehicles. The villa also pays homage to the car: the driveway underneath the house is a semi-circular path whose radius corresponds to the turning radius of a 1927 Citroën. Naked light bulbs illuminate the interior. The pipework is visible in the bathrooms. It is no longer man who is the measure of this house, but the machine.

It is a rational house where everything is in its place, just as the architect stipulated. A house in which placing a few sofas in the living room was not recommended. A house in which piling books in corners was highly discouraged. A house in which filling the walls with artwork would be irreverent. A house in which replacing the steel front door would be blasphemous. A house which prohibits being inhabited.

Residency Post #4: The Attic of Modernism

Posted in Exhibitions by Julie Rafalski on February 13, 2013

This is a series of blogs posts about my residency at the Westminster Reference Library that coincides with my exhibition Not in View, which continues until 23rd February. Westminster Reference Library Gallery, 1st Floor; 35 Saint Martin’s Street, London WC2H 7HP

The modernist ideals of the 20th century of creating utopias and better societies ultimately proved incapable of being realized, partially because many of those ideals were married with Soviet or Nazi ideologies and partially because creating utopias is not exactly a piece of cake. When all these utopian ideas didn’t work, or at least didn’t live up to the promises in the written manifestos, many considered the entire modernist project a failure.

Yet perhaps there are things that have been overlooked in this period: things that were started and never quite finished, things that never developed their full potential, ideas that were incomplete, forgotten, lost, marginalized pushed aside? What hides in the attic of modernism? Can all that was lost or never realized be found again? And how would the history of that era have unfolded, if some of these marginalized ideas had not been pushed aside? How would our present time look now?

But this loss applies not just to the 20th century, but to all centuries. Perhaps it is a rule of time, that there is always something lost to counterbalance that which is gained. In the poem Under a Certain Little Star, Wislawa Szymborska writes, “I apologise to time for the muchness of the world overlooked per second.”

Perhaps the muchness of what hides in the modernist attic will never fully come to light. But with that knowledge, maybe one can still rummage. Who knows what one might find?

Below:

Folded House Esters I and II

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